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Large English Walnut Butt

Posted on Friday 17th June 2016
As mentioned prior here are some of the images of a large old log we dealt with today its also useful as a gauge as to age, this log had a girth of 180" at its smallest point which was around waist height as it was a short fat log, we sometimes gauge the age at around 1" per year of growth and given the house was built around 1798 it was most likely planted at that time. I didnt rob the gnome of his spade it is a full side one. Across the flare at the top it is around 8ft wide and at its narrowest point well over 4ft. It has its problems with a cavity inside but given we could only just lift it with a 4ton capable machine there is a huge amount of stunning wood still to be got from it.

Sawing English Walnut & Figured Pearwood Guitar Sets

Posted on Saturday 11th June 2016
It has been some time since we posted any news so I thought it time we caught up on what we are currently sawing. As a lot of you will know very little makes it as far as the website with most of our stock going straight out to regular buyers. We have just finished sawing a small amount of marbled English walnut and at last started sawing some figured pearwood we picked up last year. Also inculded is an image of one of the very rare solid burr walnut tops we recently cut for a builder, there is no furthur stock of this as he brought all we had which was not a lot.Soon there will be news of what is one of the largest diameter walnut logs we have ever had.

Quarter Sawing English Grown American Walnut

Posted on Thursday 4th February 2016
This last month has seen us sawing the last of the logs from last year. In the following images you will see what became of the American Black Walnut we collected a few weeks ago, as it was a prime log the butt was quarter sawn for future guitar sets or makers wanting straight grain for rails and stiles etc. It is a lovely dark colour with great marbling and I am sure in a couple of years will go on to make some wonderful instruments.

Quarter Sawing English Grown American Walnut

Posted on Thursday 4th February 2016
This last month has seen us sawing the last of the logs from last year. In the following images you will see what became of the American Black Walnut we collected a few weeks ago, as it was a prime log the butt was quarter sawn for future guitar sets or makers wanting straight grain for rails and stiles etc. It is a lovely dark colour with great marbling and I am sure in a couple of years will go on to make some wonderful instruments.

Resawing new dry guitar facings

Posted on Wednesday 27th January 2016
We decided to have a short break from cutting the elm, it's a dirty slow process and one where we constantly have to clean as we go. So to break it up a bit today we cut up a large English Walnut Crotch billet along with some spalted hornbeam. The walnut is stunning some of the best ever we have cut, there are some problems in them but for small shapes they can be worked around however to my eye I would use the most spectacular of the areas and break out a pot of resin and fill any issues, it would be worth the extra time and effort. The spalted hornbeam is a first for us and there only a dozen or so tops in total, it is solid, or as solid as spalted can be, in fact it was so nice to work that after resawing we planed both faces to a 99 percent perfect finish, it's not often I would risk sending thin stock through our tungsten tipped industrial planer as it is not forgiving but it was one of those Timbers that you knew straight away it would be safe, barely moving at all in the cutting and planing to a great finish without pickup.


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Recently Added Products

Rippled English Walnut Root R6

When dealing with walnut roots, which we do rarely these days only only then with very promising pieces after many hours of working on average material thinking that every root contains stunning material as its a root, they dont, I say that having cut a lot of them. Only the very best of them containing minimal shake, expectional colour and stripe are worth the trouble and effort of sawing, these are very rare. We deal with them by trimming back the last ft or so closest to the ground subject to the log to lessen the risk of damaging a very large expensive saw, these short pieces are then taken back to our yard where we then break them up into blockis firstly with a chainsaw then on to a bandsaw, the effort is sometimes repaid with stunning pieces such as this.rnrnThis item is fresh sawn so please treat as such, if you are unsure about how to do this a little research ahead of time would be my best advice.rnrnI

Rippled English Walnut Root R5

This piece has the remains of a rot pocket on one corner I have highlighted this in the image, subject to shape it could turn out but if you wanted a wider deep shape then this is not suitable, I have discounted it on account of this.rnWhen dealing with walnut roots, which we do rarely these days only only then with very promising pieces after many hours of working on average material thinking that every root contains stunning material as its a root, they dont, I say that having cut a lot of them. Only the very best of them containing minimal shake, expectional colour and stripe are worth the trouble and effort of sawing, these are very rare. We deal with them by trimming back the last ft or so closest to the ground subject to the log to lessen the risk of damaging a very large expensive saw, these short pieces are then taken back to our yard where we then break them up into blockis firstly with a chainsaw then on to a bandsaw, the effort is sometimes repaid with stunning pieces such as this.rnrnThis item is fresh sawn so please treat as such, if you are unsure about how to do this a little research ahead of time would be my best advice.